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SHIVA SHIV LING LINGA SIVA SHANKAR MAHADEV ISHWAR ISHWARA PENDANT NECKLACE CHAIN NK0051
 

SHIVA SHIV LING LINGA SIVA SHANKAR MAHADEV ISHWAR ISHWARA PENDANT NECKLACE CHAIN NK0051

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We only Use Holy water from river Ganga Maa (that flows through Hardwar) for abhishekas during the activation process of all our Amulets & YantrasSHIVA PEWTER PENDANT NECKLACEORIGIN :: HOLY SHRINES OF HARIDWARPENDANT HEIGHT : 43mmPENDANT WIDTH : 28mmPENDANT THICKNESS : 3 mmCHAIN STRAND LENGHT : 44 Centimeters100% AUTHENTICORIGIN :: HOLY SHRINES OF HARIDWARNOTE : There may be slight variation in the picture of Lord Shiva on the pendant.Pran Pratishta (Energization) and Puja of Prathima :Since a Prathima/idol is a Man-Made object, it requires energization to infuse potency and power to benefit the owner.Before sending the Prathima,we getPran Pratishthadone by learned Purohits (Priests) without any extra charges. This is done by reciting Mantras as prescribed by Vedas, as well as Rudra Prathista yog Homa for the Lord Shiva.Prathima is Energised (Pran pratishta) by learned purohits, by reciting the vedic mantra for lord Shiva one lakh eighteen thousands time and the Homa of 108 mantra. Linga is send along with Prashad of the Pran Pratishta (no eatables are sent).The lingam (also, linga, ling, Shiva linga, Shiv ling, Sanskrit लिङ्गं, liṅgaṃ, meaning "mark", "sign", "gender","phallus", "inference" or "eternal procreativegerm") is a representation of the Hindu deity Shiva used for worship intemples. Whether the lingam symbolizes the physical body of the god orsomething purely spiritual is the topic of many a century-old debate withinHinduism. The lingam has been interpreted as a symbol of male creative energy orof the phallus, though today most Hindus view the linga as a symbol of divineenergy rather than as a sexual symbol. The lingam is often represented with theyoni, a symbol of the goddess or of Shakti, female creative energy. The unionof lingam and yoni represents the "indivisible two-in-oneness of male andfemale, the passive space and active time from which all life originates".The lingam and the yoni have been interpreted as the male and female sexualorgans since the end of the 19th century by some scholars, while to practisingHindus they stand for the inseparability of the male and female principles andthe totality of creation. The Hindu scripture Shiva Purana describes the worship of the lingam asoriginating in the loss and recovery of Shiva's phallus, though it alsodescribes the origin of the lingam as the beginning-less and endless pillar(Stambha). The Linga Purana also supports the latter interpretation as a cosmicpillar, symbolizing the infinite nature of Shiva. Shiva is pictured asLingodbhava, emerging from the Lingam - the cosmic fire pillar - proving hissuperiority over gods Brahma and Vishnu. DefinitionThe Sanskrit term लिङ्गं liṅgaṃ, transliterated as linga, has diverse meaning ranging from gender andsex to philosophic and religions to uses in common language, such as a mark,sign or characteristic. Vaman Shivram Apte's Sanskrit dictionary provides manydefinitions:§A mark, sign, token, an emblem, a badge,symbol, distinguishing mark, characteristic;§A false or unreal mark, a guise,disguise, a deceptive badge;§A symptom, mark of disease§A means of proof, a proof, evidence§In logic, thehetuormiddle term in a syllogism§The sign of gender or sex§In grammar, gender§The genital organ of Shiva worshiped inthe form of a Phallus§The image of a god, an idol§One of the relations or indicationswhich serve to fix the meaning of a word in any particular passage§In Vedānta philosophy, the subtle frame orbody, the indestructible original of the gross or visible body§A spot or stain§The nominal base, the crude form of anoun§In Sāk philosophy, Pradhāna or Prakriti§The effect or product of evolution froma primary cause and also as the producer§Inference, conclusionHistoryOriginAnthropologist Christopher John Fuller conveys that although mostsculpted images (murtis) are anthropomorphic, the aniconic Shiva Linga is animportant exception. Some believe that linga-worship was a feature ofindigenous Indian religion. There is a hymn in the Atharvaveda which praises a pillar (Sanskrit:stambha), and this is one possible origin of linga-worship. Some associateShiva-Linga with this Yupa-Stambha, the sacrificial post. In that hymn adescription is found of the beginningless and endless Stambha orSkambha and itis shown that the said Skambha is put in place of the eternal Brahman. Asafterwards the Yajna (sacrificial) fire, its smoke, ashes and flames, the somaplant and the ox that used to carry on its back the wood for the Vedicsacrifice gave place to the conceptions of the brightness of Shiva's body, histawny matted-hair, his blue throat and the riding on the bull of the Shiva. TheYupa-Skambha gave place in time to the Shiva-Linga. In the Linga Purana thesame hymn is expanded in the shape of stories, meant to establish the glory ofthe great Stambha and the supreme nature of Mahâdeva (the Great God, Shiva). Historical periodAccording to Saiva Siddhanta, which was for many centuries the dominantschool of Shaiva theology and liturgy across the Indian subcontinent (andbeyond it in Cambodia), the linga is the ideal substrate in which theworshipper should install and worship the five-faced and ten-armed Sadāśiva, the form of Shiva who is the focaldivinity of that school of Shaivism. The oldest example of a lingam which is still used for worship is inGudimallam. According to Klaus Klostermaier, it is clearly a phallic object,and dates to the 2nd century BC. A figure of Shiva is carved into the front ofthe lingam. Modern periodBritish missionary William Ward criticized the worship of the lingam(along with virtually all other Indian religious rituals) in his influential1815 book A View of the History, Literature, and Mythology of the Hindoos,calling it "the last state of degradation to which human nature can bedriven", and stating that its symbolism was "too gross, even whenrefined as much as possible, to meet the public eye." According to BrianPennington, Ward's book "became a centerpiece in the British constructionof Hinduism and in the political and economic domination of thesubcontinent." In 1825, however, Horace Hayman Wilson's work on thelingayat sect of South India attempted to refute popular British notions thatthe lingam graphically represented a human organ and that it aroused eroticemotions in its devotees. Monier-Williams wrote in Brahmanism and Hinduism that the symbol oflinga is "never in the mind of a Saiva (or Siva-worshipper) connected withindecent ideas, nor with sexual love." According to Jeaneane Fowler, thelinga is "a phallic symbol which represents the potent energy which ismanifest in the cosmos." Some scholars, such as David James Smith, believethat throughout its history the lingam has represented the phallus; others, suchas N. Ramachandra Bhatt, believe the phallic interpretation to be a lateraddition. M. K. V. Narayan distinguishes the Siva-linga from anthropomorphicrepresentations of Siva, and notes its absence from Vedic literature, and itsinterpretation as a phallus in Tantricsources. Ramakrishna practiced Jivanta-linga-puja, or "worship of the livinglingam". At the Paris Congress of the History of Religions in 1900,Ramakrishna's follower Swami Vivekananda argued that the Shiva-Linga had itsorigin in the idea of the Yupa-Stambha or Skambha—the sacrificial post, idealized in Vedicritual as the symbol of the Eternal Brahman. This was in response to a paperread by Gustav Oppert, a German Orientalist, who traced the origin of theShalagrama-Shila and the Shiva-Linga to phallicism. According to Vivekananda,the explanation of the Shalagrama-Shila as a phallic emblem was an imaginaryinvention. Vivekananda argued that the explanation of the Shiva-Lingaas aphallic emblem was brought forward by the most thoughtless, and was forthcomingin India in her most degraded times, those of the downfall of Buddhism. According to Swami Sivananda, the view that the Shiva lingam representsthe phallus is a mistake; The same sentiments have also been expressed by H. H.Wilson in 1840. The novelist Christopher Isherwood also addresses theinterpretation of the linga as a sex symbol. The Britannica encyclopedia entryon lingam also notes that the lingam is not considered to be a phallic symbol; Wendy Doniger, an American scholar of the history of religions, states:For Hindus, the phallus in the background, the archetype (if I may usethe word in its Eliadean, indeedBastianian, and non-Jungian sense) of whichtheir own penises are manifestations, is the phallus (called the lingam) of thegod Siva, who inherits much of the mythology of Indra (O'Flaherty, 1973). Thelingam appeared, separate from the body of Siva, on several occasions... Oneach of these occasions, Siva's wrath was appeased when gods and humanspromised to worship his lingam forever after, which, in India they still do.Hindus, for instance, will argue that the lingam has nothing whatsoever to dowith the male sexual organ, an assertion blatantly contradicted by thematerial. However, Professor Doniger clarified her viewpoints in a later book, TheHindus: An Alternative History, by noting that some texts treat the linga as ananiconic pillar of light or an as an abstract symbol of God with no sexualreference and comments on the varying interpretations of the linga from phallicto abstract.According to Hélène Brunner, the lines traced on thefront side of the linga, which are prescribed in medieval manuals about templefoundation and are a feature even of modern sculptures, appear to be intendedto suggest a stylised glans, and some features of the installation process seemintended to echo sexual congress. Scholars like S. N.Balagangadhara havedisputed the sexual meaning of lingam. Naturally occurring lingamsAn ice lingam at Amarnath in the western Himalayas forms every winter fromice dripping on the floor of a cave and freezing like astalagmite. It is verypopular with pilgrims.Shivling (6543m) is also a mountain in Uttarakhand (the G
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